LINUXGAMES

Screencheat Released

October 22nd, 2014 by TimeDoctor

If you’ve ever played a multiplayer, split-screen, console game you’re going to be right at home with multiplayer split-screen FPS Screencheat. It’s like those older games, except everyone is invisible at all times and it’s impossible to be polite and avoid looking at their corner of the screen. In this game you must do so to figure out where they are and shoot them. It’s a very strange concept but I’d like to try it.

Screencheat on Steam

GamerGate

October 16th, 2014 by TimeDoctor

We don’t post much in the way of editorials, but it seems inappropriate to remain silent on an issue that is making everyone who plays games or is associated with them look bad.

If you’re not familiar with the issue, there’s a hashtag on twitter called #GamerGate (that link will take you to see it, be warned that it is often nsfw when it gets bad.) It’s been covered in traditional media such as the New York Times, The Boston Globe, CNN, and almost everywhere else. 

This hashtag recently became a bit more popular after the people posting in that hashtag decided to harass an indie game developer for having sex with other people who work in games.The actual name was recently coined by an actor, Adam Baldwin, but this kind of harassment has been going on for a long time. 

I’ve met the developer briefly at Steam Dev Days, and used her games as an example about why voting systems like Steam’s Greenlight might not work out for games that aren’t game-y, but are more serious than fun if they’re about a topic like her Depression Quest, which is also available for Linux. That’s about as much relation to Linux as there would be, if not for people like this posting to the Kernel mailing list after a developer stopped working on Intel’s drivers for Linux due to Intel withdrawing an advertising campaign from Gamasutra after Gamasutra posted an editorial article the GamerGate community didn’t like.

All of this comes after years of harassment to other women who work on games or write and speak about them. Of course this has happened in tech and with Linux as well. In 2000 I saw pornography displayed during the Linux World convention in New York City at a booth run by the Window Maker team, I’m sure there are many other examples that are more recent. At the time I didn’t know what to say about it, and didn’t even begin to think critically of the actions of my peers who did that. Of course that kind of thing could cause someone to not want to be involved in that free software project, or the project I was involved with at the time and wasn’t appropriate.

What is new is that people who come to that hashtag unaware of the backstory might be drawn in by the recent #GamerGate creed of going after unethical games journalists. The thing is, there have been plenty of real ethical concerns in video games. They just haven’t been as motivating to the people who are in this hashtag as the idea of a sex scandal for review coverage. As has been pointed out, it doesn’t even make sense to attack a game developer for increased game journalist ethics.

Supporters of GamerGate’s ethos have created lists of websites to not read because they disagree with the content of those sites or their editorial integrity. They’ve also created lists of people to attack and then later others who support the GamerGate ethos have cried foul and said the list-makers and attackers didn’t represent them, and all that they’re concerned about is ethics in video game journalism.

That hashtag. It’s so obviously for those that want to harass women and other writers who have spoken out about it in tech and games. Things have even escalated to threats of harm against people and parents getting concerned about their kids joining up with gamergate

I don’t understand how anyone anyone could buy into the notion of this sex-for-review-coverage scheme after it has been thoroughly debunked and the main proponents of it have names that include the term “Fart.” I don’t understand how someone could look at that name, and the things that are in that hashtag on twitter, and go “Yep, sign me up!”

What I do know is that games are changing. There are now “walking simulators” like Gone Home and Dear Esther, to name a few games from one genre, that don’t fit in with what everyone wants. You don’t have to like them, or play them, or even read the reviews and coverage to understand that it’s OK for new games to exist.

You can still be critical of something while you enjoy it. It is okay to play Hotline Miami and also be a little bit concerned with the amount of violence and how enjoyable it is, or the way that women are displayed in it. I love that game, it won’t stop being fun even if I take a minute to think about what I’ve played.

This is ridiculous. If you’re actually concerned about video game ethics your concerns will not be heard amongst those who promote violence and harassment of all kinds. Jeff Gerstmann of Giant Bomb said it best:

I’m a man in the media business. I’ve been doing this since I was 16. I could sit here and defend my line of work, which I think is largely just and on the level, but if you’re deep into the ‘Gate, your only reaction will be to probably say “of course he would say that.” That’s fine. Some of you have been politicized so completely that this is just another “left vs. right” issue to you, and many of you are using the same language used in arguments over other hardened political issues. So keep on “rolling coal” on video games journalism if you think it’s actually that corrupt. I’m not here to tell you what to do. But you might want to really look in the mirror and ask yourself if you’re spending your time crusading for the right fight. That’s all. Make sure this is the position you want to take and, more importantly, how you want that position to be represented. If you genuinely care about ethics in games journalism, GamerGate is not the spot for you. To some of them, “unethical” is being used as a synonym for “a viewpoint I don’t agree with.” That’s not an ethics discussion. That’s an attempt to silence criticism. Again, if you do care about ethics in games journalism, GamerGate is destroying your message.

I have personally done some questionable things on LG in the past that I look back on and realize weren’t ethically appropriate. I’ve written reviews of games for LG where I knew the person who brought them to Linux maybe too well to be critical of the game itself. When Loki Games was still around I sometimes had to justify my request for a review copy of a game to Loki, and in so doing I might have corrupted the review. I wanted more games for Linux and for that to succeed I was sometimes very picky to only review games that would review well and I would like.

You could read that and ask “Why should I trust your opinion on GamerGate?” You don’t have to. Please read what others have written and what I’ve linked above, you’ll probably know if you want to get involved with it or not very quickly. Hopefully we won’t have to post about this again and we can resume our regular crawl of Linux releases and the occasional review. There is plenty of good news for gaming on Linux. #GamerGate isn’t good news for gaming or anyone.

Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel Released

October 14th, 2014 by TimeDoctor

Borderlands the presequel

All of that Borderlands 2 porting work that Asypr did hasn’t gone to waste. Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel was just released and is a simultaneous release with Mac and Windows. It is a little odd that this is a full-price $60 game, the early impressions I’ve heard haven’t been extremely positive as the main (and only?) gameplay system change is the addition of an annoying oxygen meter. So this isn’t a mainline Borderlands sequel and was developed by 2k Australia. Hrm.

Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel on Steam.

We’re Steam Curating Now

October 13th, 2014 by TimeDoctor

Steam curators

Valve recently added a new storefront to Steam, and in addition to enhanced search controls for finding games available for Linux, you can now follow us on our Steam curation page. We’ll post some recommendations there, and you should join our group if you’d like to chat or play with your fellow LG readers.

The LinuxGames Steam Curation Page on Steam

Borderlands 2 Released

October 13th, 2014 by TimeDoctor

Borderlands 2

Colorful shooters a plenty as Borderlands 2 has finally been release for Linux. This is the 2nd port from Aspyr, who were commonly known as a Mac porting house and also brought us XCom: Enemy Unknown. Gearbox’s Borderlands 2 has tons of content and is a super fun mix of RPG and FPS.

Borderlands 2 on Steam

Roundabout Released

October 13th, 2014 by TimeDoctor

Roundabout

Would you like to drive a limousine that is constantly spinning while you try to deliver passengers to their destinations? In Roundabout you can do that and watch some great 70’s B-Movie cut scenes in-between levels 

Roundabout on Steam

Heavy Bullets Released

October 13th, 2014 by TimeDoctor

Heavy bullets

Heavy Bullets is a roguelike FPS with a bright neon aesthetic from Terri Vellmann. There aren’t many others, and this is the first roguelike FPS for Linux.

Heavy Bullets on Steam

Stronghold 3 Gold Released

October 13th, 2014 by TimeDoctor

Stronghold 3 Gold

Castle-builder Stronghold 3 has been released. It’s got some great graphics and seemed decently fun from the couple hours I spent with it. Though it has mostly negative reviews on Steam, we can finally play it in Linux.

Stronghold 3 Gold on Steam

Cannon Brawl Released

September 19th, 2014 by TimeDoctor

If you’d like to blow up enemy towers, castles, and such, Cannon Brawl by Turtle Sandbox has been released. It’s a bit of a cross between worms and tower defense. Our sister-site timedoctor.org has a review and video.

Or you can skip to getting it on Steam where it’s 25% for a bit:

Cannon Brawl on Steam.

Shadowrun: Dragonfall Director’s Cut Released

September 18th, 2014 by TimeDoctor

Shadowrun Dragonfall Director's Cut

Some players have recommended skipping the recent cyberpunky CRPG Shadowrun Returns and going to straight to the Dragonfall expansion. Now you can do just that with the standalone expansion pack, Dragonfall Director’s Cut. This director’s cut of the Dragonfall expansion pack adds new music, missions, and revamps much of the game’s RPG and strategy systems. This standalone edition is also free to anyone who purchased the Dragonfall expansion on Steam or Good Old Games.

Shadowrun: Dragonfall Director’s Cut on GOG, on Steam, on the Humble Store.

Shadowrun Returns is also on sale for the next few days through Steam.

Another World Released

September 16th, 2014 by TimeDoctor

 

Another World

Éric Chahi’s seminal platformer Another World is finally available for Linux. Originally released in 1991 for the Amiga and Atari ST, this is a native port by Ryan Gordon of the 20th Anniversary Edition. It’s also known as Out Of This World. There is a detailed history of the game and its design on Cheese Talks that includes quotes from Ryan.

This edition of the game features optional remastered graphics, new difficulty options, gamepad support, and all of the Steam extras.

Another World on Steam.

Wine 1.7.26

September 8th, 2014 by Marv

A new development release of Wine has been announced. New items in this release include:

  • Still more DirectWrite functions.
  • Improvements to the common File Dialog.
  • A number of C runtime improvements.
  • Various bug fixes.

Download: [ Wine 1.7.26 ]

Hatoful Boyfriend Released

September 4th, 2014 by TimeDoctor

If you’ve ever wanted to be the only human student in a school full of pigeons your time is now. The visual novella Hatoful Boyfriend has been released. You are invited to class. This is an updated remake from the 2011 original flash game, which was also updated later in 2011. You can find way, way, too much information on those games in the wikipedia article for the game.

Hatoful Boyfriend on Steam

Mountain Released

August 19th, 2014 by TimeDoctor

Mountain

Would you like to build a Mountain? If so, David O’Reilly and Double Fine have your back with 99 cents of mountain building. The description is simply:

~ you are mountain – you are god ~

Ambient procedural mountain game, as seen on The Internet.

Mountain on Steam

Trace Vector Released

August 19th, 2014 by TimeDoctor

Trace Vector

High-speed action-arcade game Trace Vector has been released on Steam:

Trace Vector is a high speed action arcade game with puzzle elements. Featuring a modern take on vector style graphics, Trace Vector plays like an easy to learn, hard to master, game of the golden age of the 80′s video arcades. Race your space ship through each geometric level grabbing extra fuel cells along the way. Reach a viable goal to shatter the networks’ hold on your ship and increase your speed. Simple controls keep you focused on navigating the increasingly complex webs at ever increasing speeds. Collect fuel cells and warp time to assist in the precision maneuvering needed to ace a level! Warping time quickly exhausts precious fuel. If you deplete your fuel and crash it’s game over.

Hyperspace networks have hazards at every turn. Dead end paths, barriers, and worm holes that can send you back in time and space increase the danger; forcing you to think ahead and be prepared to deal with your previous route through the network. Hyperspace is a strange place. Go forth brave pilot. Keep your wits in order, escape the neon labyrinths, and scavenge enough fuel to return home safely.

Trace Vector on Steam

GOG.com and Linux

July 27th, 2014 by Crusader

GOG.com announced this week that they now offer Linux game titles!

A while ago, we’ve announced our plans to add Linux support as one of the features of our digital platform, with 100 games on the launch day sometime this fall. We’ve put much time and effort into this project and now we’ve found ourselves with over 50 titles, classic and new, prepared for distribution, site infrastructure ready, support team trained and standing by, and absolutely no reason to wait until October or November. We’re still aiming to have at least 100 Linux games in the coming months, but we’ve decided not to delay the launch just for the sake of having a nice-looking number to show off to the press. It’s not about them, after all, it’s about you. So, one of the most popular site feature requests on our community wishlist is granted today: Linux support has officially arrived on GOG.com!

The first 50+ titles we’ve have in store for you come from all the corners of our DRM-Free catalog. Note that we’ve got many classic titles coming officially to Linux for the very first time, thanks to the custom builds prepared by our dedicated team of penguin tamers. That’s over twenty fan-favorite GOG.com classics, like FlatOut&Flatout 2, , Darklands, or Realms of the Haunting we’ve personally ushered one by one into the welcoming embrace of Linux gamers. That’s already quite a nice chunk of our back-catalog, and you can expect more from our dedicated Linux team soon!

Now, for the recent titles. We’ve got some indie games with native Linux versions that finally find their well-deserved spot in our store. Among them, debuting on Linux, CLARC – a well received original comedic Sci-Fi puzzler. On top of that, be on the lookout for two new additions to the GOG.com catalog: Gods Will Be Watching (coming in a couple of hours) and Unrest:Special Edition (Linux build coming right up!), both of them very fresh and intriguing. This is the very first time we can provide you with all the PC versions of a premiere game, and we will continue to do so in the future. If there’s a Linux version of a title we’re releasing, our aim is to deliver it to you Day-1. But enough about us, let’s talk about the games.

The full list of currently available titles can be found in the announcement post.

Frozen Cortex Beta

July 27th, 2014 by Crusader

Mode 7, the developers of Frozen Synapse, have released a beta of their latest title Frozen Cortex for Linux:

Civilization: Beyond Earth Previews

July 27th, 2014 by Crusader

Two previews of the Alpha Centauri-inspired and Civ5 sequel Civilization: Beyond Earth were posted this week:

Kerbal Space Program: First Contract

July 20th, 2014 by Crusader

watercolor_ksp

My beloved Kerbal Space Program has been updated to version 0.24, dubbed “First Contract” because of an enhanced Career mode:

Players will now have the opportunity to take on Contracts, manage Funds, a new in-game currency that allows players to buy rocket and plane parts, and earn Reputation for their efforts. Reputation is raised for completed contracts and bringing Kerbals back in one piece. Failing missions, or gasp, blowing them up lowers Reputation.

Squad has also posted a FAQ to address the most common questions.

Nightmare Cooperative

July 20th, 2014 by Crusader

The Verge posted a look at The Nightmare Cooperative as an intro to the usually uncompromisingly sadistic roguelike genre:

At the outset, you control a single explorer, moving one square at a time through a series of rooms. The turn-based structure means that speed isn’t important, but every time you make a move your enemies will do the same, forcing you to plan ahead accordingly. Where things get especially tricky is that your party will grow as you meet other explorers along the way — and you’ll control the entire group at the same time.

This is the first I’ve heard of it, and it looks neat: